36 Comments
Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Beautiful. I haven’t seen many butterflies this year but every I have seen is the more than the last.

Butterflies strong!!

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Thanks, Rita. Yep, every butterfly is memorable!

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Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Thanks for this. We visited our Montpelier in August and could feel the pain plus the community resilience. It was heart breaking but evidence of hope was everywhere. Butterflies are now abundant here on the Gulf Coast and birds are returning. We too are recovering from floods but nothing like what happened to Montpelier/Barre.

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Our homes in Vermont and Florida are now a bit closer in the wake of those storms. Thanks, Roger!

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Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

"Hope is no mere aspiration that things will turn out well. Hope instead takes our hand, shines a light ahead, and pushes us onward into the messiness and uncertainties of life."

Bryan, I've never read a more inspiring definition of hope, thank you.

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So very kind of you, Patrick. Thanks so much. Yeah, I'm trying to rely more and more on hope and less on despair these days.

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These words stood out to me also. And I would say they are both inspiring and reassuring as one moves forward toward the messiness and uncertainties.

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Thanks, Diana. As you know, the writing itself also helps one navigate the terrain of messiness and uncertainty.

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Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Lovely, as always—even in the wake of a deluge. Thank you.

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Spring on Monhegan?

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Planning to be there the last week of May!

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Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Loved this!

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Thanks, Margie. Some day we'll meet up in person among our mutual friends!

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Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Thanks for the update and the positive story of the community.

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You're very welcome, Dale. Thanks so much for reading and for caring.

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A friend of yours, John Snell, my brother-in-law, has also kept us informed.

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Oct 2, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Oh, yes. Life is hard and wonderful. Even when almost broken, I am restored as I walk where wild things go about their lives. And I am glad that others find similar solace and hope in nature. Thank you for the reminders.

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We are indeed so fortunate to find that solace among the prosaic. (Maybe that comes with age -- I dunno. But I'm grateful nonetheless.)

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Oct 3, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

“Hope instead takes our hand, shines a light ahead, and pushes us onward into the messiness and uncertainties of life.” Beautiful. Just beautiful. And true.

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Hope does indeed expand that definition of the "good life," as you well know. Thanks, Kimberly!

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Oct 3, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Strength is not the most powerful strutting along, it's those with the least, putting one foot (or wing) in front of the other. Two butterflies, or a city, recently flooded, moving forward. Thanks, as always, for the hope in your writing Bryan.

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As always, you're most welcome, Kate. Thanks for reading. One foot (or wing) in front of the other .... I don't always have that kind of hope, but It's nice to have it close to home.

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I love the juxtaposition of the steady rebirth of the town with the continuation of butterfly breeding--both undergoing utter and essential transformations. We were washed out here in the Adirondacks as well, but nothing as apocalyptic as what you all experienced.

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We won't know for sure about those checkerspots by the river, much in the same way we can't be certain about Montpelier's fate. But I'll certainly report on it here on Chasing Nature next spring! (I'm optimistic.)

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Oh, Bryan, that photo of the books outside the library 💔 What an intense time we’re living through--vulnerability so apparent. Bless the Baltimore Checkerspots, and the way you attend to them as they navigate these times alongside us. I’m wary of hope, too; but even warier that I never let go of it completely. Thank you for shining your light.

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Thanks, Chloe, for the reminder to safeguard our embrace of hope.

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Oct 4, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Well written, Brian. The destruction is so sad. We went through a lot too a year ago here in southwest Florida from a hurricane and are just getting back to normal.

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In the wake of these storms, Vermont and Florida are now sharing new experiences on Planet Earth.

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Oh wow. I did not expect the beautiful -- and weep-inducing -- turn this essay took. So, so beautiful. But the library! Just gutting. That's one of the things that many of us might forget after a natural disaster -- restoring libraries and bookstores, because we humans need story and connection to one another more than anything.

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And you yourself so remind of of this at On the Commons and in your other writings. Thanks!

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You're always so kind spreading the generosity, Bryan! 🧡

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Great essay Bryan. So sad about the devastation and loss of life but nature and humans have a way of bouncing back. I know this but it is still heartbreaking. Awesome to see the Baltimore Checkerspots that survived!

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Thanks, Lisa. I've always had a weak spot for those checkerspots. I'll report on their progress (and my city's) next year!

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Oct 13, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Bryan, I am awed by your observations of Nature and its intersection with our species. Thank you for sharing all with us.

If it’s any consolation for the loss of your Checkerspot colony, my milkweed patch was home to hundreds and hundreds of these caterpillars that became magnificent fliers.

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Thanks, Jayne. So your milkweeds gave rise to Monarchs or perhaps Milkweed Tussock Moth? Those Baltimore Checkerspots don't eat milkweed. 😋

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Oct 13, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

So much for my butterfly knowledge! Yes, we had Monarchs, but not in high numbers. I’ll check Tussock Moth caterpillars photos!

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