21 Comments

Both beautiful and sad. Thank you for sharing these glimpses I would never have seen without you.

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You're welcome, Carolyn. I'm glad I can bring these places to you. Thanks so much for reading.

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Sep 27, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Heading out there with VCE for the weekend and hope to bump into you. We’ll bring some migrants with us! 😉

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Yes, please -- bring migrants!

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Sep 27, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

memories of Monhegan !

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Wish you two were here!

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These photos feel like a big exhale - suxh expansive beauty 💚

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I do breathe more here!

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Wow, and I echo Carolyn's comment below -- both beautiful and sad. I'm sure this has to be the dumbest question in the world, but have you read "The Beak of the Finch" by Jonathan Weaver about the work of Princeton's Peter and Rosemary Grant's work on the Galapagos Islands? I read it on a whim -- a random bookstore purchase -- and found it to be spellbinding.

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Thanks, Ben. Beak of the Finch -- a must-read. A classic. I think it won a Pulitzer.

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I had no idea you had painted ladies too. They migrate to the U.K. from Europe in large numbers some years, sadly, not for a while though.

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Yes, indeed. The most cosmopolitain butterfly on Earth. So versatile. Glad you enjoy them as well. (They'll be back!)

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Sep 27, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Bird cast says Lincoln county ME is typical of “historic” data so far. But how far back is their history. Maybe weather isn’t blowing them out to island.

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Sep 28, 2023·edited Sep 28, 2023Author

Yeah, this year it's all about the winds -- basically nothing from the west or northwest. Zilch. So fewer songbirds blown out here.

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Sep 27, 2023Liked by Bryan Pfeiffer

Another beautiful post. Thank you for bringing us along on your journeys and sharing these magical moments with us.

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So much to share out there. I'm privileged to do so!

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So that's what they mean when they say 'Gentian blue'. One learns and lives.

Do the lower numbers of birds mean that lesser numbers are losing their course? I know it's a vain hope though.

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I hadn't known that hue. It really is a lovely blue. And the lower numbers of migrants this fall is mostly owing to the weather. I could have made it more clear in the post that the songbirds are more apt to get blown out to sea when we get west or northwest winds at night. As they're heading south, it pushes them to overshoot the coastline, which basically runs east-west for a bit here in Maine. We're sort of locked into some high pressure without much by way of typical autumn winds.

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Ohhh, thank you for sneaking us into the island in your laptop case. This is treasure.

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Hi Bryan welcoming your post today as I awoke feeling so hopeless yes we know without counting, and Philisophy of Biology led me to understand our current need is an observation of nature without interference. Another threat has arisen one we hoped would be good, that is offshore wind farms birds cannot navigate. Noticing one has been placed in an area of North West England infront of long time wildlife reserve leaves me in dismay I can't help but notice the dwindling numbers of sea faring birds here.

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So cool that you got to see the Wandering Glider and I loved your description of them "migrating like an albatross across oceans." I just recently discovered the Feather Atlas, a great resource for identifying bird feathers: https://www.fws.gov/lab/featheratlas/

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